Page number book reviews from mandating vaccination is harmful

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Some people propose a long list of conditions – fibromyalgia, irritable bowel syndrome, chronic fatigue syndrome, chronic Lyme disease, tension headaches, interstitial cystitis, et cetera – that they think of as mostly or entirely psychosomatic. He thinks that just about anything that can’t be traced to a well-understood physiological cause is probably psychosomatic – in his language, Mind-Body Syndrome or MBS.On the other hand, patients’ rights groups get very upset at claims that their conditions are “all in their head”, accuse doctors of thinking that they’re lazy or making up their symptoms, and pass around stories with titles like RE: RE: RE: FWD: RE: THE MEDICAL PROFESSION about some guy whose doctor dismissed him as making up his symptoms but who was later diagnosed with zebra-itis and cured with an experimental gene therapy treatment. He quotes a fascinating theory by Edward Shorter that this all dates back to the invention of the tendon hammer, ie that little thing doctors hit your knee with: An important advance in medicine was the discovery of deep tendon reflexes.Howard Schubiner started the lecture he gave at the hospital where I work. Schubiner isn’t an obvious quack – he’s a professor of medicine at the local university, directs a clinic at a reputable hospital nearby, and is on the editorial boards of a bunch of medical journals.And although his lecture raised what we will generously call a few red flags, there was also just enough interesting stuff there that I couldn’t resist buying his book Unlearn Your Pain to learn more. Schubiner’s specialty is psychosomatic complaints – bodily symptoms that don’t come from any obvious disease and seem to reflect psychological stress. Most doctors have stories about conversion disorder – usually patients who become “paralyzed” in previously healthy limbs after some life crisis.[Content warning: discussion of chronic pain and related conditions, and the debate over whether some of them may be psychological in origin.None of this is medical advice or a recommendation to start or stop any form of therapy. Some of the most interesting lectures in medical training are the ones that start with “Okay, you’re all going to think I’m a quack, but…” This was how Dr.

Psychologists like to say that it’s subconscious – whatever that means.Just like somebody crippled by panic attacks, the symptoms are real and involuntary, but they’re also psychologically produced.The existence of this category isn’t controversial, but its size definitely is.The same sort of thing works for pseudoseizures – apparent seizures not associated with objective seizure EEG activity.There’s a legend about a neurologist telling a medical student that a certain patient’s fit was a pseudoseizure, and the patient interrupting his seizure to protest “No it isn’t! Most people who have worked with conversion or pseudoseizure patients don’t doubt their inherent honesty. Such a person genuinely can’t move their limb, can’t just decide not to have seizures.

Psychologists like to say that it’s subconscious – whatever that means.Just like somebody crippled by panic attacks, the symptoms are real and involuntary, but they’re also psychologically produced.The existence of this category isn’t controversial, but its size definitely is.The same sort of thing works for pseudoseizures – apparent seizures not associated with objective seizure EEG activity.There’s a legend about a neurologist telling a medical student that a certain patient’s fit was a pseudoseizure, and the patient interrupting his seizure to protest “No it isn’t! Most people who have worked with conversion or pseudoseizure patients don’t doubt their inherent honesty. Such a person genuinely can’t move their limb, can’t just decide not to have seizures.The simple test of striking a tendon with a reflex hammer can quickly distinguish pathological from psychological paralysis.

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